Monthly Archives: March 2011

Reflections on The Bologna Children’s Book Fair 2011

By Rana DiOrio, Founder
I am attending the largest children’s book fair in the world for the second time. There is so much to say, but once again I will convey only the essential snapshot of this important annual industry event.
Tools of Change. This year, the fair was preceded by an O’Reilly Media conference titled, The World of Storytelling is Changing–Tools of Change and was co-hosted by the Bologna Book Fair organizers to explore publishing in the digital age. I attended along with delegates from 25 other countries. What was most intriguing to me was realizing how far ahead the United States is in integrating digital strategies and media into our business models. The senior most executive at one of Italy’s top publishers admitted in her keynote address that the US is 4-5 years ahead of Italy; and a progressive entrepreneur who founded one of the hottest app development companies in the UK admitted that the US is 1-2 years ahead of the UK in digital advancements in the industry.
My Fantastic, Elastic Brain. Last year, I didn’t even know where to begin at this massive trade show. My learning curve was steep. With the help of ForeWord Reviews, we hired a fabulous foreign rights agent, Sylvia Hayse of Sylvia Hayse Literary Agency, LLC, who followed up on leads generated during the conference last year and secured several translation rights deals for Little Pickle Press. This year, she has 5 titles to market (vs. 2) and has already garnered interest from publishers in Brazil, Denmark, Hungary, Israel, Korea, Romania, and Turkey! With the wealth of knowledge I learned from last year, I set off to identify titles for us to acquire rights to. The process is akin to finding a needle in a haystack. I did, however, manage to find one Australian series and one title from the UK that I hope to acquire. I also had material conversations with mass-market distributors in the US and the UK who expressed an interest in our award-winning What Does It Mean . . . ?® series of books. Moreover, I met an artist agency that represents a very talented array of artists from all over the world. Finally, I met some awe-inspiring artists whose talent humbled me.
Take-away Messages. While I cannot claim these as my own, as they are posted throughout the event, the themes of the Bologna Children’s Book Fair are worth conveying to you:
·        Close your eyes
·        See the images
·        Read slowly
·        Savor the wor(l)d
·        Feel the colours
·        See the sound
·        Smell the paper
·        Touch the story
·        Imagine the future
Conclusions. One thing remains eminently clear–the children’s book publishing industry continues to change rapidly. Little Pickle Press is honored to be among those on the vanguard of the innovation.

Reflections on The Bologna Children’s Book Fair 2011

By Rana DiOrio, Founder
I am attending the largest children’s book fair in the world for the second time. There is so much to say, but once again I will convey only the essential snapshot of this important annual industry event.
Tools of Change. This year, the fair was preceded by an O’Reilly Media conference titled, The World of Storytelling is Changing–Tools of Change and was co-hosted by the Bologna Book Fair organizers to explore publishing in the digital age. I attended along with delegates from 25 other countries. What was most intriguing to me was realizing how far ahead the United States is in integrating digital strategies and media into our business models. The senior most executive at one of Italy’s top publishers admitted in her keynote address that the US is 4-5 years ahead of Italy; and a progressive entrepreneur who founded one of the hottest app development companies in the UK admitted that the US is 1-2 years ahead of the UK in digital advancements in the industry.
My Fantastic, Elastic Brain. Last year, I didn’t even know where to begin at this massive trade show. My learning curve was steep. With the help of ForeWord Reviews, we hired a fabulous foreign rights agent, Sylvia Hayse of Sylvia Hayse Literary Agency, LLC, who followed up on leads generated during the conference last year and secured several translation rights deals for Little Pickle Press. This year, she has 5 titles to market (vs. 2) and has already garnered interest from publishers in Brazil, Denmark, Hungary, Israel, Korea, Romania, and Turkey! With the wealth of knowledge I learned from last year, I set off to identify titles for us to acquire rights to. The process is akin to finding a needle in a haystack. I did, however, manage to find one Australian series and one title from the UK that I hope to acquire. I also had material conversations with mass-market distributors in the US and the UK who expressed an interest in our award-winning What Does It Mean . . . ?® series of books. Moreover, I met an artist agency that represents a very talented array of artists from all over the world. Finally, I met some awe-inspiring artists whose talent humbled me.
Take-away Messages. While I cannot claim these as my own, as they are posted throughout the event, the themes of the Bologna Children’s Book Fair are worth conveying to you:
·        Close your eyes
·        See the images
·        Read slowly
·        Savor the wor(l)d
·        Feel the colours
·        See the sound
·        Smell the paper
·        Touch the story
·        Imagine the future
Conclusions. One thing remains eminently clear–the children’s book publishing industry continues to change rapidly. Little Pickle Press is honored to be among those on the vanguard of the innovation.

What Does It Mean To Be Global?

By Dani Greer
It’s the title of the first Little Pickle Press book by Rana DiOrio, but do any of us realize the enormity of the question until disaster strikes? As the natural and man-made emergencies unfold in Japan, we are all learning lessons about being global. The most important, of course, is caring for our fellow humans. Tragedy tends to galvanize us and focus our very best energies to help those in need.
Little Pickle Press, like so many other businesses and individuals, feels compelled to lend support to the people of Japan in some tangible way. For the next month, 20% of the proceeds from any purchases made on our website using LPPJAPAN promo code at checkout will be donated to Mercy Corps. (This is in addition to the 10% that always gets donated to Starlight Children’s Foundation for the What Does It Mean To Be . . . ?® series of books.)
Mercy Corps is a global aid agency engaged in transitional environments that have experienced some sort of shock: natural disaster, economic collapse, or conflict. Aid workers first move as quickly as possible to bring food and supplies to stricken areas.  Later they help in enabling people to rebuild their economy with community-driven and market-led programs. The organization was founded in 1979 as Save the Refugees Fund, a task-force organized by Dan O’Neill in response to the plight of Cambodian refugees fleeing famine, war, and genocide. By 1982, the organization had expanded its work to other countries, was joined by Ellsworth Culver (Mercy Corps co-founder), and was renamed Mercy Corps International to reflect its broader mission.
We hope you join us in helping Mercy Corps bring desperately-needed relief to the people of Japan. Because being global means… “understanding how your actions affect another person’s experience. 

Being global means being a citizen of the world. 

So let’s do whatever we can to be global.”

http://www.littlepicklepress.com
To learn more about this organization, please visit and connect with Mercy Corps at their online sites:
Twitter

To buy books and benefit Mercy Corps, please go to our shopping cart by clicking here.

What Does It Mean To Be Global?

By Dani Greer
It’s the title of the first Little Pickle Press book by Rana DiOrio, but do any of us realize the enormity of the question until disaster strikes? As the natural and man-made emergencies unfold in Japan, we are all learning lessons about being global. The most important, of course, is caring for our fellow humans. Tragedy tends to galvanize us and focus our very best energies to help those in need.
Little Pickle Press, like so many other businesses and individuals, feels compelled to lend support to the people of Japan in some tangible way. For the next month, 20% of the proceeds from any purchases made on our website using LPPJAPAN promo code at checkout will be donated to Mercy Corps. (This is in addition to the 10% that always gets donated to Starlight Children’s Foundation for the What Does It Mean To Be . . . ?® series of books.)
Mercy Corps is a global aid agency engaged in transitional environments that have experienced some sort of shock: natural disaster, economic collapse, or conflict. Aid workers first move as quickly as possible to bring food and supplies to stricken areas.  Later they help in enabling people to rebuild their economy with community-driven and market-led programs. The organization was founded in 1979 as Save the Refugees Fund, a task-force organized by Dan O’Neill in response to the plight of Cambodian refugees fleeing famine, war, and genocide. By 1982, the organization had expanded its work to other countries, was joined by Ellsworth Culver (Mercy Corps co-founder), and was renamed Mercy Corps International to reflect its broader mission.
We hope you join us in helping Mercy Corps bring desperately-needed relief to the people of Japan. Because being global means… “understanding how your actions affect another person’s experience. 

Being global means being a citizen of the world. 

So let’s do whatever we can to be global.”

http://www.littlepicklepress.com
To learn more about this organization, please visit and connect with Mercy Corps at their online sites:
Twitter

To buy books and benefit Mercy Corps, please go to our shopping cart by clicking here.

Mom’s Choice Awards

 
Moms make 85% of all buying decisions in a household.
 
The Mom’s Choice Awards® provide a guide for excellence in family-friendly media, products and services. The annual competition gives authors, inventors, companies, parents, and others a chance to vie for recognition from an esteemed panel of judges who rate their efforts in creating quality family-friendly media products and services.
The judges are bound by a strict code of ethics, and the evaluation process uses a propriety methodology in which entries are scored on a number of factors including production quality, design, educational value, entertainment value, originality, appeal, and cost.
Each year, when the awards are announced, products and services bearing the MCA seal help parents, caregivers, educators, and retailers select quality materials and products for children and families.
Little Pickle Press is pleased to share with you that we have won another MCA honor, this time a gold medal for What Does It Mean To Be Present? in the category of  Children’s Picture Books, Audio Books & eBooks (Ages 0-9). Thank you, Mom’s Choice Awards, for our third medal! We are truly thrilled and honored to be recognized again this year.
If you’d like to learn more about the book, please read a guest review by clicking here. You can read more about the book, view a book trailer, and purchase a copy at the website.
If you already have a copy of What Does It Mean To Be Present? by all means tell us what you think of it by leaving a comment!

Mom’s Choice Awards

 
Moms make 85% of all buying decisions in a household.
 
The Mom’s Choice Awards® provide a guide for excellence in family-friendly media, products and services. The annual competition gives authors, inventors, companies, parents, and others a chance to vie for recognition from an esteemed panel of judges who rate their efforts in creating quality family-friendly media products and services.
The judges are bound by a strict code of ethics, and the evaluation process uses a propriety methodology in which entries are scored on a number of factors including production quality, design, educational value, entertainment value, originality, appeal, and cost.
Each year, when the awards are announced, products and services bearing the MCA seal help parents, caregivers, educators, and retailers select quality materials and products for children and families.
Little Pickle Press is pleased to share with you that we have won another MCA honor, this time a gold medal for What Does It Mean To Be Present? in the category of  Children’s Picture Books, Audio Books & eBooks (Ages 0-9). Thank you, Mom’s Choice Awards, for our third medal! We are truly thrilled and honored to be recognized again this year.
If you’d like to learn more about the book, please read a guest review by clicking here. You can read more about the book, view a book trailer, and purchase a copy at the website.
If you already have a copy of What Does It Mean To Be Present? by all means tell us what you think of it by leaving a comment!

Book Review: What Does It Mean To Be Present?

What Does It Mean To Be Present?
Author: Rana DiOrio
Illustrator: Eliza Wheeler
Publisher: Little Pickle Press
ISBN: 978-0-9840806-8-7

By Katy Mooney, Executive Coach and Consultant

What Does It Mean to be Present? is a sweet little book by Rana DiOrio (and illustrated by Eliza Wheeler) packed with a powerful message that is as appropriate for adults as it is for kids – pay attention in the present moment. Period. Simple, right? Simple, yes, but not so easy. Talking while driving, surfing while watching TV, pretending to listen while waiting to talk, planning what’s next before we have experienced now. In a culture that applauds multi-tasking and abhors stillness, we are constantly learning how to avoid truly being with ourselves and, in turn, teaching our children the same. Without even knowing it, we are disconnected – from others, our environment and, most importantly, ourselves.

Being present, though, this insightful book tells us, is not about physical presence, presenting, or gift giving. It’s about listening to yourself and others, noticing the needs of others, focusing on now, being grateful and learning from mistakes. (That’s how you grow, silly!) It’s also about slowing down to fully experience all of the nuance and loveliness within each moment. Life is full of awesomeness if you pay attention.

In 25 beautifully illustrated pages, Ms. DiOrio’s unique children’s book concisely touts the same profound, ever-relevant message of consciousness that Eckhart Tolle shares with his millions of adult readers in an age-appropriate way for kids: the present moment, now, is all that we have. Ever. So…all together everyone…pause, listen, notice, be grateful, share, and learn. In others words, be present. You, your friends and the world can be richer, fuller and happier when we are present. I know this to be true in my own life and the lives of my executive clients. Try it and see. And if you agree…pass it on!
~~~~~~
To purchase a copy of What Does It Mean to Be Present?, please click here.

Book Review: What Does It Mean To Be Present?

What Does It Mean To Be Present?
Author: Rana DiOrio
Illustrator: Eliza Wheeler
Publisher: Little Pickle Press
ISBN: 978-0-9840806-8-7



By Katy Mooney, Executive Coach and Consultant


What Does It Mean to be Present? is a sweet little book by Rana DiOrio (and illustrated by Eliza Wheeler) packed with a powerful message that is as appropriate for adults as it is for kids – pay attention in the present moment. Period. Simple, right? Simple, yes, but not so easy. Talking while driving, surfing while watching TV, pretending to listen while waiting to talk, planning what’s next before we have experienced now. In a culture that applauds multi-tasking and abhors stillness, we are constantly learning how to avoid truly being with ourselves and, in turn, teaching our children the same. Without even knowing it, we are disconnected – from others, our environment and, most importantly, ourselves.

Being present, though, this insightful book tells us, is not about physical presence, presenting, or gift giving. It’s about listening to yourself and others, noticing the needs of others, focusing on now, being grateful and learning from mistakes. (That’s how you grow, silly!) It’s also about slowing down to fully experience all of the nuance and loveliness within each moment. Life is full of awesomeness if you pay attention.

In 25 beautifully illustrated pages, Ms. DiOrio’s unique children’s book concisely touts the same profound, ever-relevant message of consciousness that Eckhart Tolle shares with his millions of adult readers in an age-appropriate way for kids: the present moment, now, is all that we have. Ever. So…all together everyone…pause, listen, notice, be grateful, share, and learn. In others words, be present. You, your friends and the world can be richer, fuller and happier when we are present. I know this to be true in my own life and the lives of my executive clients. Try it and see. And if you agree…pass it on!
~~~~~~
To purchase a copy of What Does It Mean to Be Present?, please click here. If you add What Does It Mean To Be Green? or Sofia’s Dream to your order and use the LPPGREEN promo code at checkout, you will receive 25% off your entire order.

Bologna Children’s Book Fair Reminder

The Bologna Children’s Book Fair, which takes place March 28-31, is the largest children’s book fair in the world. Rana DiOrio, chief executive pickle at Little Pickle Press, will be attending the fair as a participant, a doer, and to forge connections to take Little Pickle Press to the next level of growth and expansion. Here’s what she hopes to accomplish:

  • Identify foreign rights partners for our titles.
  • Identify titles published in other geographies and/or languages that we may wish to acquire foreign rights to publish in the United States or all English-speaking countries
  • Identify digital applications partners for our content. 
  • Identify and meet with potential content and distribution partners.
  • Meet with potential strategic and financial investors.
  • Get a sense of where the global industry is moving.

If you care to meet with the Little Pickle Press team regarding any of these topics, we would like to connect with you in Bologna. Please email us in advance. We look forward to meeting you!

Bologna Children’s Book Fair Reminder

The Bologna Children’s Book Fair, which takes place March 28-31, is the largest children’s book fair in the world. Rana DiOrio, chief executive pickle at Little Pickle Press, will be attending the fair as a participant, a doer, and to forge connections to take Little Pickle Press to the next level of growth and expansion. Here’s what she hopes to accomplish:

  • Identify foreign rights partners for our titles.
  • Identify titles published in other geographies and/or languages that we may wish to acquire foreign rights to publish in the United States or all English-speaking countries
  • Identify digital applications partners for our content. 
  • Identify and meet with potential content and distribution partners.
  • Meet with potential strategic and financial investors.
  • Get a sense of where the global industry is moving.

If you care to meet with the Little Pickle Press team regarding any of these topics, we would like to connect with you in Bologna. Please email us in advance. We look forward to meeting you!

Leave No Trace: The Miwoks

By Cameron Crane

When Land Wilson recently mentioned Miwok Indians in his Monday article, I was immediately brought back to a field trip I went on when I was in around the fourth grade. We had been studying California’s history, and had just begun learning about the Miwok people. Our teacher took us to Kule Loklo, a re-created Miwok village in Point Reyes, California. I remember wandering the village in surprise, wondering how it was possible that a culture that existed for thousands of years had seemed to vanish into thin air. If the Miwoks really did live here, I remember thinking, where were their buildings or schools? Where were their roads? How was it possible that I had never seen a trace of Miwok life?

It was not until Land’s article prompted me to research the Miwok tribe that I got my answer: the Miwok people did not want to leave a trace. They people desired to live in harmony with nature, seeing no division between nature, culture, and religion. Instead these existed as one intricate system in everyday life. The Miwok people believed in protecting this system, which meant using the land lightly, leaving no footprint, and giving thanks to nature whenever they utilized its goods. They had a great understanding of the resources available to them, and passed the knowledge of how to nurture these resources to preserve them for future generations. It was because of this knowledge they were able to coexist with nature, without damaging it.

As I reflect back on the wonderful and intricate culture of the Miwok people, I can’t help but wonder what California will look like after we have utilized it for thousands of years. Our footprint will definitely not be invisible, and we can already see that the resources available to future generations will be different- and potentially scarcer- than those we have today.

This month, as we look at different ways to nurture nature, it may be helpful to look for answers from our predecessors. As the Miwok people understood, sometimes it is necessary to take from nature, but we must do it thoughtfully, with respect, and with a commitment to give back. Our relationship with nature has and always will be one of the most important relationships we have. We must preserve it.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Remember that Little Pickle Press books that promote conservation – like What Does It Mean To Be Green? and Sofia’s Dream – are a great way to share sound environmental concepts with your children. Don’t forget that all of our books are printed and shipped in an environmentally-sustainable manner. It’s part of what sets us apart. You can buy these books today and get 25% off with coupon code LPPGREEN at check-out.

Cleaning Up the Dumps

By Land Wilson

I grew up in Marin County and I remember communities actively filling in Bay Area wetlands. One of these areas is now where our local Home Depot resides. As a kid, going to “The Dump” was a fun day trip. At the check-in booth we were given a lollipop and we could help our parents toss garbage over the edge of a steep embankment. The crazy thing is that in the many decades leading up to the 1980’s, there were no hazardous waste collection centers for households. Everything went into landfill.

I have to share that it was my father-in-law, Roger Ahlenius, who was the primary force behind saving Santa Margarita Island, which you can read more about in yesterday’s post. At a time when people were steam-rolling ahead with filling the bay, he was out trying to save it. His mark on the world with this little island, in my mind is one of the most honorable achievements a person can accomplish. Today there is even a trail named in his honor.


Let’s face it, future generations are going to want and need tidal marshes restored. I foresee they’ll even want the old toxic dump areas cleaned. Let’s show future generations that we care about the world they’ll inherit by working towards what I refer to as a “zero landfill” lifestyle. Bea Johnson and her family of Mill Valley, CA do a great job demonstrating how this can be accomplished at their Zero Waste Home website. The more we protect nature now, the more our descendants will thank us.

We face extreme environmental challenges, but I am hopeful because humans can be smart. People in large numbers around the world are becoming more aware of how interconnected we are to our ecosystems and how our well-being is tied to a healthy natural world. As the earth becomes more populated, protecting our nature is going to become more vital. Instead of sprawling outwards and building over our nature, let’s sprawl upwards and create beautiful, green, passive energy cities that nourish people. 

Asking the question, “Where will all the nature go?” is a great reminder of our duty to revere and protect the nature we have left.
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Land Wilson is the author of Sofia’s Dream which is available for purchase by clicking here

Please remember, too, that 20% of all Little Pickle Press sales will benefit Mercy Corps and their relief efforts in Japan. Use coupon code LPPJAPAN at check-out and thank you for your generosity.

Cleaning Up the Dumps

By Land Wilson

I grew up in Marin County and I remember communities actively filling in Bay Area wetlands. One of these areas is now where our local Home Depot resides. As a kid, going to “The Dump” was a fun day trip. At the check-in booth we were given a lollipop and we could help our parents toss garbage over the edge of a steep embankment. The crazy thing is that in the many decades leading up to the 1980’s, there were no hazardous waste collection centers for households. Everything went into landfill.

I have to share that it was my father-in-law, Roger Ahlenius, who was the primary force behind saving Santa Margarita Island, which you can read more about in yesterday’s post. At a time when people were steam-rolling ahead with filling the bay, he was out trying to save it. His mark on the world with this little island, in my mind is one of the most honorable achievements a person can accomplish. Today there is even a trail named in his honor.


Let’s face it, future generations are going to want and need tidal marshes restored. I foresee they’ll even want the old toxic dump areas cleaned. Let’s show future generations that we care about the world they’ll inherit by working towards what I refer to as a “zero landfill” lifestyle. Bea Johnson and her family of Mill Valley, CA do a great job demonstrating how this can be accomplished at their Zero Waste Home website. The more we protect nature now, the more our descendants will thank us.

We face extreme environmental challenges, but I am hopeful because humans can be smart. People in large numbers around the world are becoming more aware of how interconnected we are to our ecosystems and how our well-being is tied to a healthy natural world. As the earth becomes more populated, protecting our nature is going to become more vital. Instead of sprawling outwards and building over our nature, let’s sprawl upwards and create beautiful, green, passive energy cities that nourish people. 

Asking the question, “Where will all the nature go?” is a great reminder of our duty to revere and protect the nature we have left.
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Land Wilson is the author of Sofia’s Dream which is available for purchase by clicking here

Please remember, too, that 20% of all Little Pickle Press sales will benefit Mercy Corps and their relief efforts in Japan. Use coupon code LPPJAPAN at check-out and thank you for your generosity.

Where Will All the Nature Go?

By Land Wilson


There is a neighborhood in North San Rafael, California, built around a tidal canal. In one area, the canal circles a delightful open-space park that is full of wildlife: Santa Margarita Island. This picturesque setting is home to three varieties of majestic oaks and eye-catching rock formations. The marshy banks with native reeds and pickle weed plants probably look close to what Miwoks saw centuries ago. Over the years, I’ve spotted countless birds, like Black-Crowned Night Herons, American Coots, Mallards, Marsh Hawks and nesting White Tailed Kites.

In the 1970’s, developers were keen on turning the island into a tennis club with a restaurant and marina development. Debate raged because neighbors wanted to preserve it as public open space. At one point, in a heated county planning meeting, when it looked like the developers were going to get their way, a child stood up and asked, “But where will all the nature go?” The room fell silent. No one knew how to answer.


Nobody knows what went through the minds of the developers, but most anyone with a conscience would agree that there is something wrong with telling a child that nature will just have to find another home. Nature can’t always find another home. Sometimes it is gone for good. What message do we give our youth when our actions imply that if we want something and nature has to go, that’s just what is done?

Many believed that the words of this child turned the tide of this debate. The island and its surrounding tidal marshes were spared, unlike much of the Bay Area’s other marshlands, filled in mostly for short-term private gain over the past two centuries. Thankfully, people today recognize that bay marshes are one of the most biologically productive habitats known on earth. 

The list of why we should revere our tidal marshes is long: 
    • They filter pollutants and sediments from upland runoff 
    • They provide habitat for fish, invertebrates, reptiles, birds, mammals and oxygen producing plants  
    • They provide hatchery and nursery areas for the fish, shellfish and waterfowl that humans eat
    • They provide vital stopover points for migrating birds
    • They aid in flood control to protect our homes and businesses
    • They prevent erosion of our waterfront property
    • They provide beautiful vistas for our pleasure
    Have you had a similar situation where you live? Please share how your community helped saved wildlife habitat from development.

      Where Will All the Nature Go?

      By Land Wilson


      There is a neighborhood in North San Rafael, California, built around a tidal canal. In one area, the canal circles a delightful open-space park that is full of wildlife: Santa Margarita Island. This picturesque setting is home to three varieties of majestic oaks and eye-catching rock formations. The marshy banks with native reeds and pickle weed plants probably look close to what Miwoks saw centuries ago. Over the years, I’ve spotted countless birds, like Black-Crowned Night Herons, American Coots, Mallards, Marsh Hawks and nesting White Tailed Kites.

      In the 1970’s, developers were keen on turning the island into a tennis club with a restaurant and marina development. Debate raged because neighbors wanted to preserve it as public open space. At one point, in a heated county planning meeting, when it looked like the developers were going to get their way, a child stood up and asked, “But where will all the nature go?” The room fell silent. No one knew how to answer.


      Nobody knows what went through the minds of the developers, but most anyone with a conscience would agree that there is something wrong with telling a child that nature will just have to find another home. Nature can’t always find another home. Sometimes it is gone for good. What message do we give our youth when our actions imply that if we want something and nature has to go, that’s just what is done?

      Many believed that the words of this child turned the tide of this debate. The island and its surrounding tidal marshes were spared, unlike much of the Bay Area’s other marshlands, filled in mostly for short-term private gain over the past two centuries. Thankfully, people today recognize that bay marshes are one of the most biologically productive habitats known on earth. 

      The list of why we should revere our tidal marshes is long: 
        • They filter pollutants and sediments from upland runoff 
        • They provide habitat for fish, invertebrates, reptiles, birds, mammals and oxygen producing plants  
        • They provide hatchery and nursery areas for the fish, shellfish and waterfowl that humans eat
        • They provide vital stopover points for migrating birds
        • They aid in flood control to protect our homes and businesses
        • They prevent erosion of our waterfront property
        • They provide beautiful vistas for our pleasure
        Have you had a similar situation where you live? Please share how your community helped saved wildlife habitat from development.

          The Book Store of Your Dreams

          When one thinks of a “tattered cover”, a book comes to mind – one that is often-enjoyed and well-loved. The same holds true for the Tattered Cover Book Store in Denver, Colorado.
          One of the largest independent book stores in the United States, it was purchased by Joyce Meskis in 1974 and made its home in Cherry Creek for 20 years before moving to the historic downtown Lowenstein Theater on Colfax Avenue. The popular bookstore also opened numerous other branches over the years, all providing a cozy and inviting atmosphere to its patrons. 
          Long before chain stores offered comfortable chairs and coffee, the Tattered Cover opened its doors and arms to book lovers from every walk of life, and their popularity never waned. Over 400 authors, illustrators, and special guests have visited and spoken at these locations, including Julia Childs, Barack Obama, Isabel Allende, Kurt Vonnegut, and J.K. Rowling.
          When Little Pickle Press Director of Sales, Katy Kenney, visited the LoDo Tattered Cover recently, she was thrilled to see a table in the children’s section spotlighting What Does It Mean To Be Present? and What Does It Mean To Be Global?
          During her visit, Katy met with Judy Bulow, lead buyer for children’s books. Judy has been with the Tattered Cover for 22 years. She and her husband moved here from Illinois and raised their family in Denver.  Katy asked Judy what makes TC stand out from other book stores and she said simply. “diversity.”
          Joining them were two popular TC employees, Jocelyn and Steve, who are the Storytime  leaders at the  Colfax store every Tuesday morning at 10:30.  These two are a dynamic team.  They get upwards of 40 kids per story time session. Katy asked them how they did it and they said, “lots of creativity, activities, music, and snacks!”
          Little Pickle Press is so pleased to present the Tattered Cover in our first Featured Bookstore Monthly Review. We are tickled to have our books in the store as well, and completely understand why they recently won the Tickle City Award.

          If you are in Denver, we highly encourage you to stop in at any of the Tattered Cover locations and pull up a chair. Tell them Little Pickle Press sent you. You’ll be welcome to stay as long as you like, although we don’t recommend you hang out so long you turn into a wax figure like this fellow did!
            
          Be sure to connect with the Tattered Cover at their various online sites as well: 

          If you’ve visited any of the Tattered Cover locations in Denver, by all means tell us about it in the comments. We’d love to know your very favorite thing about the store.

          The Book Store of Your Dreams

          When one thinks of a “tattered cover”, a book comes to mind – one that is often-enjoyed and well-loved. The same holds true for the Tattered Cover Book Store in Denver, Colorado.
          One of the largest independent book stores in the United States, it was purchased by Joyce Meskis in 1974 and made its home in Cherry Creek for 20 years before moving to the historic downtown Lowenstein Theater on Colfax Avenue. The popular bookstore also opened numerous other branches over the years, all providing a cozy and inviting atmosphere to its patrons. 
          Long before chain stores offered comfortable chairs and coffee, the Tattered Cover opened its doors and arms to book lovers from every walk of life, and their popularity never waned. Over 400 authors, illustrators, and special guests have visited and spoken at these locations, including Julia Childs, Barack Obama, Isabel Allende, Kurt Vonnegut, and J.K. Rowling.
          When Little Pickle Press Director of Sales, Katy Kenney, visited the LoDo Tattered Cover recently, she was thrilled to see a table in the children’s section spotlighting What Does It Mean To Be Present? and What Does It Mean To Be Global?
          During her visit, Katy met with Judy Bulow, lead buyer for children’s books. Judy has been with the Tattered Cover for 22 years. She and her husband moved here from Illinois and raised their family in Denver.  Katy asked Judy what makes TC stand out from other book stores and she said simply. “diversity.”
          Joining them were two popular TC employees, Jocelyn and Steve, who are the Storytime  leaders at the  Colfax store every Tuesday morning at 10:30.  These two are a dynamic team.  They get upwards of 40 kids per story time session. Katy asked them how they did it and they said, “lots of creativity, activities, music, and snacks!”
          Little Pickle Press is so pleased to present the Tattered Cover in our first Featured Bookstore Monthly Review. We are tickled to have our books in the store as well, and completely understand why they recently won the Tickle City Award.

          If you are in Denver, we highly encourage you to stop in at any of the Tattered Cover locations and pull up a chair. Tell them Little Pickle Press sent you. You’ll be welcome to stay as long as you like, although we don’t recommend you hang out so long you turn into a wax figure like this fellow did!
            
          Be sure to connect with the Tattered Cover at their various online sites as well: 

          If you’ve visited any of the Tattered Cover locations in Denver, by all means tell us about it in the comments. We’d love to know your very favorite thing about the store.

          LPP Will Be Attending the CAEYC Conference on March 24th

          Little Pickle Press is ever on the look-out for philosophical partnerships, and The California Association for the Education of Young Children (CAEYC) is without question a kindred spirit on many levels. They state on their webpage:

          CAEYC envisions a respected professional workforce providing developmentally appropriate and culturally sensitive, high-quality, early care and education for all young children achieved through research, education, professional development and advocacy.

          Independent affiliate members of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the CAEYC is one of 430 nationwide affiliates, and itself has over 8,000 members. Therefore, it is a vital and influential organization for those involved with the welfare of children and their education at an early age.

          One of its major projects, the CAEYC Annual Conference and Expo, is coming up on March 24-26 at the Sacramento Convention Center. This year’s theme is We’re Better Together: Collaborating to Improve the Lives of Children.

          Three members of the Little Pickle Press team will be walking the conference for a day with various goals in mind. Here is what each hopes to gain from the experience:

          Jenni Kirshman, Sales Associate, Northern California: (1) To identify potential customers; (2) to learn about the state of the art in early childhood education; (3) in particular, I’m looking forward to listening to Dr. Bruce Perry’s (http://www.childtrauma.org/images/stories/bios/perry_bio_10.pdf) keynote address.
          Leslie Iorillo, Director, Art & Marketing: (1) to identify brand-appropriate partners; and (2) to deepen my knowledge of early childhood education so we can develop products and services that best serve teachers.
          Cameron Crane, Marketing Specialist: (1) to meet industry participants; (2) to tweet about developments at the conference and expo; and (3) to have some fun!
          If you will be at the conference and would like to meet with these Little Pickle Press representatives about our children’s books, please email. Books like What Does It Mean To Be Green? are relevant for children as young as four, and this title is included in our current Spring promotion. Get 25% off with coupon code LPPGREEN at check-out.

          LPP Will Be Attending the CAEYC Conference on March 24th

          Little Pickle Press is ever on the look-out for philosophical partnerships, and The California Association for the Education of Young Children (CAEYC) is without question a kindred spirit on many levels. They state on their webpage:

          CAEYC envisions a respected professional workforce providing developmentally appropriate and culturally sensitive, high-quality, early care and education for all young children achieved through research, education, professional development and advocacy.

          Independent affiliate members of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, the CAEYC is one of 430 nationwide affiliates, and itself has over 8,000 members. Therefore, it is a vital and influential organization for those involved with the welfare of children and their education at an early age.

          One of its major projects, the CAEYC Annual Conference and Expo, is coming up on March 24-26 at the Sacramento Convention Center. This year’s theme is We’re Better Together: Collaborating to Improve the Lives of Children.

          Three members of the Little Pickle Press team will be walking the conference for a day with various goals in mind. Here is what each hopes to gain from the experience:


          Jenni Kirshman, Sales Associate, Northern California: (1) To identify potential customers; (2) to learn about the state of the art in early childhood education; (3) in particular, I’m looking forward to listening to Dr. Bruce Perry’s (http://www.childtrauma.org/images/stories/bios/perry_bio_10.pdf) keynote address.
          Leslie Iorillo, Director, Art & Marketing: (1) to identify brand-appropriate partners; and (2) to deepen my knowledge of early childhood education so we can develop products and services that best serve teachers.
          Cameron Crane, Marketing Specialist: (1) to meet industry participants; (2) to tweet about developments at the conference and expo; and (3) to have some fun!
          If you will be at the conference and would like to meet with these Little Pickle Press representatives about our children’s books, please email. Books like What Does It Mean To Be Green? are relevant for children as young as four, and this title is included in our current Spring promotion. Get 25% off with coupon code LPPGREEN at check-out.

          Art Collections for Children

          Building a Lifelong Passion for Fine Arts and a Real Art Collection for Your Children

          By  Laurence Lafforgue, ArtWeLove Founder

          Like Rana DiOrio, the founder of Little Pickle Press, and many reading this blog, I am a mom and also an entrepreneur on a mission. I help people make the best of contemporary art part of their lives easily, enjoyably, and affordably. My online store, ArtWeLove.com makes fine art finally collectible. We work with leading contemporary artists – those in museums and galleries around the country – to produce affordable museum-quality limited editions of their works, which everyone can buy off our website for as little as $25.


          Recently, I’ve decided to bring my own experience of being a mother into my venture by creating ArtWeLove for Kids, a selection of kid-friendly art that’s not kidding around.
          This is how I’ve brought my own experience of being a mother into my venture.  It’s with Paloma, my now 2-year old daughter, that I’ve started thinking about ways to engage children with the arts at a young age. Art is a powerful way to foster creativity in children and also a great way to lift their spirits, as testified by the incredible work that an organization like RxArt does to bring contemporary fine art into children’s hospitals.

          Very naturally, I found myself wondering what to put on the walls of my daughter’s bedroom, but I did not like the idea of using so-called “children’s art” that wasn’t going to last past Paloma’s 5th birthday. I began asking myself why should I settle for this when I work with leading contemporary artists to produce affordable limited editions of their work that could last a lifetime? As it turns out, many of these world-renowned artists are parents, too, and have produced engaging, vibrant, and imaginative art with their little ones in mind.

          So I began working with some of our artists to select from our collection those prints that would stimulate the brains of little ones, like high-contrast, colorful pieces (especially important for infant brain development), abstract pieces, and illustrations that could provide the backdrop to engaging activities with my daughter.
          It was really fun to discover Paloma was really into abstract and conceptual imageries early on, and then started turning to more representational and illustration pieces when she hit two and could start telling herself stories.

          The best part is that these editions are all collectible items: exclusive, numbered, paired with a certificate of authenticity. So while I’m decorating my child’s bedroom without breaking the bank, I’m also building a small collection of prints by leading artists for my children that will only appreciate over time. Like good wine, it will all age well, and I can rotate some of these prints in other parts of my home too, because while they work really well for children, they also work as masterpieces all around.  

          Last but not least, most of our prints are made with fade-resistant, archival-quality ink and are printed on paper made from tree-free cotton linters salvaged from the textile industry. Because collecting art should also be a responsible and sustainable human activity.

          I hope you will enjoy our selection of exclusive photographs and illustrations, and that they provide a vibrant, imaginative way for you and your children to explore story-telling and discover forms and colors.