Monthly Archives: October 2010

Did you know that LPP participated in the DEMAN event at Duke?

By Rana DiOrio, Founder, Little Pickle Press

On Thursday, I returned to my alma mater, Duke University, for the first time since my 5 year reunion. I was invited to present at the DEMAN (Duke Entertainment, Media, and the Arts Network) symposium to share ideas among alumni and students as part of the 2010 Duke Arts Festival. I was so honored to be part of this vibrant information exchange and celebration of the arts.

Right now I am sitting in Perkins Library, THE busiest place on Duke’s campus and where I spent much of my undergraduate tenure. I’m humbled to say that all three of LPP’s What Does It Mean To Be . . . ?® titles are now among the over 6 million volumes in the library’s prestigious collection. It only seemed fitting that I draft my impressions of the DEMAN weekend from a comfortable chair in Perkins Library.

The People. Thirty Duke alums representing a wide variety of professions across the entertainment, media, and arts industries participated in the DEMAN event. Among them: Fred Goldring, Founder of Goldring Strategies, former entertainment lawyer to huge recording artists, and current member of the President’s Committee on the Arts; Rome Hartman, Executive Producer of BBC World New America; Dan Levinson, President of Moxie Pictures, a global, multimedia production company; and Viswa Subbaraman, Founder and Artistic Director of Opera Vista, an award-winning opera company in Houston, TX.

To give you a sense of the students who participated in the event, let me summarize the profiles of a couple of the students who sat at our table last evening. Alexa is a senior majoring in Russian who is a classical violinist and who adores contemporary art. She comes from a family of artists, is interested in pursuing a career in the arts, and is seeking more information about what’s out there for her. Sarah is a sophomore majoring in Literature who is also a violinist, and enjoys writing poetry. She is trying to figure out how she can make a living writing as she has been told that most writers are also Starbucks® baristas.

The Mission. The objective of DEMAN is to offer a medium to help alumni engage with students and other alumni, opening previously unopened doors in these industries of talent. As William Wright-Swadel, Fannie Mitchell Executive Director of the Duke Career Center, said in his address to alumni and students last night, the alumni are part of the Duke family, here to be helpful to you, to answer your questions, to dispel myths, to open doors, and to invest themselves in you.

The Passion. Another speaker at the dinner last night identified the common denominator of the disparate members of DEMAN quite simply as passion. We are passionate about what we do; we are passionate about Duke; and we really want to help Duke students to live their dreams.

The Outcome. I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to come back to my alma mater, to meet some fascinating and accomplished alumni, to interact with some amazing students, and, to a certain extent, to help shape our future by helping and inspiring them.
The Call to Action. Please show your support of DEMAN by “liking” them on Facebook. And if you find yourself inspired to tweet on Twitter about DEMAN, please use the #DEMAN hashtag. Thank you!

Did you know that LPP participated in the DEMAN event at Duke?

By Rana DiOrio, Founder, Little Pickle Press

On Thursday, I returned to my alma mater, Duke University, for the first time since my 5 year reunion. I was invited to present at the DEMAN (Duke Entertainment, Media, and the Arts Network) symposium to share ideas among alumni and students as part of the 2010 Duke Arts Festival. I was so honored to be part of this vibrant information exchange and celebration of the arts.

Right now I am sitting in Perkins Library, THE busiest place on Duke’s campus and where I spent much of my undergraduate tenure. I’m humbled to say that all three of LPP’s What Does It Mean To Be . . . ?® titles are now among the over 6 million volumes in the library’s prestigious collection. It only seemed fitting that I draft my impressions of the DEMAN weekend from a comfortable chair in Perkins Library.

The People. Thirty Duke alums representing a wide variety of professions across the entertainment, media, and arts industries participated in the DEMAN event. Among them: Fred Goldring, Founder of Goldring Strategies, former entertainment lawyer to huge recording artists, and current member of the President’s Committee on the Arts; Rome Hartman, Executive Producer of BBC World New America; Dan Levinson, President of Moxie Pictures, a global, multimedia production company; and Viswa Subbaraman, Founder and Artistic Director of Opera Vista, an award-winning opera company in Houston, TX.

To give you a sense of the students who participated in the event, let me summarize the profiles of a couple of the students who sat at our table last evening. Alexa is a senior majoring in Russian who is a classical violinist and who adores contemporary art. She comes from a family of artists, is interested in pursuing a career in the arts, and is seeking more information about what’s out there for her. Sarah is a sophomore majoring in Literature who is also a violinist, and enjoys writing poetry. She is trying to figure out how she can make a living writing as she has been told that most writers are also Starbucks® baristas.

The Mission. The objective of DEMAN is to offer a medium to help alumni engage with students and other alumni, opening previously unopened doors in these industries of talent. As William Wright-Swadel, Fannie Mitchell Executive Director of the Duke Career Center, said in his address to alumni and students last night, the alumni are part of the Duke family, here to be helpful to you, to answer your questions, to dispel myths, to open doors, and to invest themselves in you.

The Passion. Another speaker at the dinner last night identified the common denominator of the disparate members of DEMAN quite simply as passion. We are passionate about what we do; we are passionate about Duke; and we really want to help Duke students to live their dreams.

The Outcome. I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to come back to my alma mater, to meet some fascinating and accomplished alumni, to interact with some amazing students, and, to a certain extent, to help shape our future by helping and inspiring them.
The Call to Action. Please show your support of DEMAN by “liking” them on Facebook. And if you find yourself inspired to tweet on Twitter about DEMAN, please use the #DEMAN hashtag. Thank you!

Did You Know Little Pickle Press Has Books in Madrid, Spain?

By Karen Friedman

This is a unique Spanish school for young children from 0-6yrs old in the suburbs of Madrid, Spain. A warm, family environment pervades the natural surroundings. Set amidst old, large trees, El Ardal School offers creative, independent learning with an open-minded, loving approach.

There are a lot of international families in the school and many of the teachers are native English speakers. The children learn basic, educational skills, with emphasis on values such as inclusion, nature, caring for the environment, happiness etc. Within the school´s curriculum there are activities such as swimming, drama, art, psychomobility, nature study and English.

In a special area, there are workshops for both parents and children on the weekends and evenings, fostering arts and crafts plus cooking skills. Many interesting things can be found in our special area including cakes, homemade breads, silver jewelry, baby´s woolens, recycled furniture, as well as the lovely books from Little Pickle Press.

Did You Know Little Pickle Press Has Books in Madrid, Spain?

By Karen Friedman

This is a unique Spanish school for young children from 0-6yrs old in the suburbs of Madrid, Spain. A warm, family environment pervades the natural surroundings. Set amidst old, large trees, El Ardal School offers creative, independent learning with an open-minded, loving approach.

There are a lot of international families in the school and many of the teachers are native English speakers. The children learn basic, educational skills, with emphasis on values such as inclusion, nature, caring for the environment, happiness etc. Within the school´s curriculum there are activities such as swimming, drama, art, psychomobility, nature study and English.

In a special area, there are workshops for both parents and children on the weekends and evenings, fostering arts and crafts plus cooking skills. Many interesting things can be found in our special area including cakes, homemade breads, silver jewelry, baby´s woolens, recycled furniture, as well as the lovely books from Little Pickle Press.

Did You Know LPP Will Be Participating in Book Fairs All Over New York City?

Part 2 by Maria Mostajo

This past summer when Rana DiOrio asked me to help her promote her books in New York City, I immediately pictured them at book fairs. The What it Means To Be…? series will be showcased at many New York City school book fairs this fall and winter- see below for a list of schools and dates.

Book fairs offer the unique opportunity for children to shop with their parents- and I don’t mean for toys and other material items. I mean shop for books: books to read and books to give as gifts. Shopping for books with a teacher or classmate can lead to considerate recommendations, discussions, and good old fashioned browsing.

Book fairs, while they put books in the hands of young people, their families and teachers, also serve the very important function of funding the school’s parent’s associations, scholarships and libraries. They also offer an opportunity for teacher’s to create classroom wish lists so that parents, grandparents and caregivers can enhance the classroom libraries and thus create an environment that will encourage reading.

If you live in or are visiting NYC, please consider attending a book fair and supporting one of the local schools. Proceeds from the sale of the What it Means series of books published by LPP will go directly to the school sponsoring the book fair.

UPCOMING BOOK FAIRS IN NYC:

Oct 26- Oct 29: Ascension School Book Fair. 220 W. 108th Street, NYC 10025. www.ascensionschoolnyc.org

Nov 6 – Nov 7: 92nd Street Y, Nursery School Book Fair. 1395 Lexington Ave., NYC 10128. www.92y.org

Nov 15-Nov 17: Temple Israel Book Fair: 112 E. 75th Street, NYC 10021. www.templeisraelnyc.org

Nov 30- Dec 2: Hewitt School Book Fair: 45 E. 75th Street, NYC 10021. www.hewittschool.org

Dec 3- Dec 4: Horace Mann Nursery School Book Fair: 50 E. 90th Street, NYC. www.horacemann.org

Dec 3: Ronald McDonald House- Festival of Lights (fundraiser). 405 E. 73rd street, NYC 10021. www.rmdh.org

Did You Know LPP Will Be Participating in Book Fairs – Part 1

Part 1 by Maria Mostajo

http://www.art.com

Every once in a while I am asked to participate in a fundraising event at my children’s school in New York City and most often I graciously decline. I am remorseful about it but have managed to rationalize it: I work full-time, I am already involved in other charitable foundations that need my skills… I just wrote out an enormous check for tuition! The one event, though, that I always support, and in fact the very first event I chaired when my now 13 year old son was three, was the book fair at his nursery school- Horace Mann.

Book fairs are still very special to me. I remember Mr.Tamberello, my fourth grade teacher, escorting our class into the library of our school where the book fair was held. I can’t recall how much money I had but I do remember that it was only enough to buy just a few books and so, I had to choose wisely. I remember gathering books in my arms and desperately searching the library to find Mr. T. He would have to decide: should I buy the several thin paperbacks in one pile or the shiny, hefty but expensive hard cover of The Secret Garden? Without hesitation, Mr. recommended The Secret Garden. “You’ll love it and will read it over and over,” he said. He was right and every time I walk past a copy of it at a book fair I recommend it to someone.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maria will be back tomorrow to share information about book fairs in New York City. Until then, tell us about the book fairs you attend, and what kinds of treasures you’ve discovered. Do you still have books you bought as a child? Please leave us a comment!

Did You Know LPP Will Be Participating in Book Fairs – Part 1

Part 1 by Maria Mostajo

http://www.art.com

Every once in a while I am asked to participate in a fundraising event at my children’s school in New York City and most often I graciously decline. I am remorseful about it but have managed to rationalize it: I work full-time, I am already involved in other charitable foundations that need my skills… I just wrote out an enormous check for tuition! The one event, though, that I always support, and in fact the very first event I chaired when my now 13 year old son was three, was the book fair at his nursery school- Horace Mann.

Book fairs are still very special to me. I remember Mr.Tamberello, my fourth grade teacher, escorting our class into the library of our school where the book fair was held. I can’t recall how much money I had but I do remember that it was only enough to buy just a few books and so, I had to choose wisely. I remember gathering books in my arms and desperately searching the library to find Mr. T. He would have to decide: should I buy the several thin paperbacks in one pile or the shiny, hefty but expensive hard cover of The Secret Garden? Without hesitation, Mr. recommended The Secret Garden. “You’ll love it and will read it over and over,” he said. He was right and every time I walk past a copy of it at a book fair I recommend it to someone.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maria will be back tomorrow to share information about book fairs in New York City. Until then, tell us about the book fairs you attend, and what kinds of treasures you’ve discovered. Do you still have books you bought as a child? Please leave us a comment!

Did You Know That Little Pickle Press Has a Really Great Chief Pickle?

by Dani Greer


Meet Rana DiOrio


I am an investor, investment banker, lawyer, and now founder and CEO of Little Pickle Press.
 
One thing I am proud of:
Being the mommy of three happy little pickles

Two of my heroes:
1. Nelson Mandela
2. Oprah Winfrey

Three things I am really good at:
1. Multi-tasking
2. Listening (while not multi-tasking)
3. Giving


Four things on my Bucket List:
1. Return to South Africa with our children to take them on safari
2. Travel to Australia and New Zealand with my family
3. Write a novel
4. Establish a private foundation and give away what I’ve earned in this lifetime

Five ways I am present is when:
1. I have one-on-one conversations with my children about stuff that matters
2. I practice yoga (most of the time!)
3. I am at the beach
4. I am holding someone I love
5. I write

Six of my favorite children’s books:
1. Caps For Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina
2. The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds
3. Knuffle Bunny by Mo Willems
4. One by Kathryn Otoshi
5. Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig
6. That Rabbit Belongs To Emily Brown by Cressida Cowell

~~~~~~~
You can view the Little Pickle Press books, including the ones Rana wrote, by clicking here. They are available in foreign language editions, e-books, and come with their own special tunes. Be sure to watch the book trailers!

Did You Know That Little Pickle Press Has a Really Great Chief Pickle?

by Dani Greer


Meet Rana DiOrio


I am an investor, investment banker, lawyer, and now founder and CEO of Little Pickle Press.
 
One thing I am proud of:
Being the mommy of three happy little pickles

Two of my heroes:
1. Nelson Mandela
2. Oprah Winfrey

Three things I am really good at:
1. Multi-tasking
2. Listening (while not multi-tasking)
3. Giving


Four things on my Bucket List:
1. Return to South Africa with our children to take them on safari
2. Travel to Australia and New Zealand with my family
3. Write a novel
4. Establish a private foundation and give away what I’ve earned in this lifetime

Five ways I am present is when:
1. I have one-on-one conversations with my children about stuff that matters
2. I practice yoga (most of the time!)
3. I am at the beach
4. I am holding someone I love
5. I write

Six of my favorite children’s books:
1. Caps For Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina
2. The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds
3. Knuffle Bunny by Mo Willems
4. One by Kathryn Otoshi
5. Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig
6. That Rabbit Belongs To Emily Brown by Cressida Cowell

~~~~~~~
You can view the Little Pickle Press books, including the ones Rana wrote, by clicking here. They are available in foreign language editions, e-books, and come with their own special tunes. Be sure to watch the book trailers!

Did You Know We Have a Really Cool Chairman of the Board?

by Dani Greer

Meet Robbie Vann-AdibÈ
  
I am a manager and entrepreneur, as well as a technologist and designer of processes and systems, and now the Chairman of the Board of Little Pickle Press. I like asking the question, “what if we threw conventional wisdom out the window and started completely from scratch?”
One thing I am proud of:
My family
Two of my heroes:
1. Martin Luther King, Jr.
2. Leonardo da Vinci
Three things I really enjoy doing:
1. Yoga
2. Snowboarding
3. Playing soccer with my children
Four things on my Bucket List:
1. Trekking in the Himalayas
2. Travel in the Amazon Basin
3. Safari in Africa
4. Urdhva Padmasana in Shirshasana
Five ways I am Global, Green, and Present:
1. My wife and I have 4 nationalities between us (Global)
2. My children attend a bi-lingual immersion Mandarin/English school (Global)
3. I bought farmland and planted a 100-tree orchard that is completely organic using no chemicals whatsoever (Green)
4. My kids yell at me when I put paper in the wrong dustbin (Green)
5. I practice yoga (Present)
Six of my favorite children’s books:
1. Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney
2. Slinky Malinki by Lynley Dodd
3. Dear Zoo by Rod Campbell
4. The Sneetches and Other Stories by Dr. Seuss
5. Stone Soup by various authors
6. The Lion Who Wanted To Love by Giles Andreae and David Wojtowycz
Welcome aboard, Robbie. We want to read more about your organic orchard in a future post!

Did You Know We Have a Really Cool Chairman of the Board?

by Dani Greer

Meet Robbie Vann-AdibÈ
  
I am a manager and entrepreneur, as well as a technologist and designer of processes and systems, and now the Chairman of the Board of Little Pickle Press. I like asking the question, “what if we threw conventional wisdom out the window and started completely from scratch?”
One thing I am proud of:
My family
Two of my heroes:
1. Martin Luther King, Jr.
2. Leonardo da Vinci
Three things I really enjoy doing:
1. Yoga
2. Snowboarding
3. Playing soccer with my children
Four things on my Bucket List:
1. Trekking in the Himalayas
2. Travel in the Amazon Basin
3. Safari in Africa
4. Urdhva Padmasana in Shirshasana
Five ways I am Global, Green, and Present:
1. My wife and I have 4 nationalities between us (Global)
2. My children attend a bi-lingual immersion Mandarin/English school (Global)
3. I bought farmland and planted a 100-tree orchard that is completely organic using no chemicals whatsoever (Green)
4. My kids yell at me when I put paper in the wrong dustbin (Green)
5. I practice yoga (Present)
Six of my favorite children’s books:
1. Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney
2. Slinky Malinki by Lynley Dodd
3. Dear Zoo by Rod Campbell
4. The Sneetches and Other Stories by Dr. Seuss
5. Stone Soup by various authors
6. The Lion Who Wanted To Love by Giles Andreae and David Wojtowycz
Welcome aboard, Robbie. We want to read more about your organic orchard in a future post!

Did You Know You Have An Alternative to Halloween?

By Dani Greer

I admit it. I’m not a big fan of Halloween. Mostly it’s the over-commercialization and the utter waste embedded into what should be a fun and simple playtime for children. Gone are the days of raiding Mom’s closet for gypsy or queen costumes and grabbing a big bag for a pretend-spooky romp through the neighborhood with best friends. Oh, and collecting all that candy loot! Even the sugar overdose probably wasn’t so bad decades ago – eating sweets was hardly a daily event. Now, it’s an invitation to childhood diabetes, and who wants that for their kids?

Still, I wouldn’t deny children the fun this holiday should be. I get ready for Halloween every year in my rural home, and though not too many kids wander to the outskirts of my little town, I’m prepared with treats. I just don’t give them the usual fare. I figure if they’re going to get candy from me, I may as well develop their tastes for something better. So I stock up on a few really good chocolates, with the idea that any leftovers can be thoroughly enjoyed by you-know-who through the rest of the year. Wicked, I now.

Recently I discovered a very cool website – Green Halloween – a non-profit, grassroots community initiative to create healthier and more Earth-friendly holidays, starting with Halloween. It began in the Seattle area in 2007 with backers such as Whole Foods Market and was such a huge success that in 2008, the initiative expanded nation-wide. In cities across the country, volunteer coordinators are turning their city’s Halloween holiday healthy and eco-friendly, but many are also raising money for their own, local nonprofit beneficiaries via the initiative.

There are so many creative treat options at the wonderful Green Halloween website, that the site is worthy of a long exploration before the big day rolls around. My favorite concept and page dealt with the idea of giving treasures rather than candy. Click here for a list of possibilities. I’d already been thinking in that direction, and last year had cool pencils made from recycled Japanese newspapers. This year, I’m digging into my huge stash of fused glass magnets and giving those, because they truly are real one-of-a-kind treasures.

I’ll probably also tuck some bookmarks into each child’s bag – these happen to be from Little Pickle Press and list their award-winning books. Who knows? Maybe What Does It Mean To Be Green? will end up on some little person’s Christmas wish-list!

What about you? How do you feel about Halloween? Are you doing anything special to keep it green and healthy for yourchildren? Leave us a comment with your ideas.

Did You Know You Have An Alternative to Halloween?

By Dani Greer

I admit it. I’m not a big fan of Halloween. Mostly it’s the over-commercialization and the utter waste embedded into what should be a fun and simple playtime for children. Gone are the days of raiding Mom’s closet for gypsy or queen costumes and grabbing a big bag for a pretend-spooky romp through the neighborhood with best friends. Oh, and collecting all that candy loot! Even the sugar overdose probably wasn’t so bad decades ago – eating sweets was hardly a daily event. Now, it’s an invitation to childhood diabetes, and who wants that for their kids?

Still, I wouldn’t deny children the fun this holiday should be. I get ready for Halloween every year in my rural home, and though not too many kids wander to the outskirts of my little town, I’m prepared with treats. I just don’t give them the usual fare. I figure if they’re going to get candy from me, I may as well develop their tastes for something better. So I stock up on a few really good chocolates, with the idea that any leftovers can be thoroughly enjoyed by you-know-who through the rest of the year. Wicked, I now.

Recently I discovered a very cool website – Green Halloween – a non-profit, grassroots community initiative to create healthier and more Earth-friendly holidays, starting with Halloween. It began in the Seattle area in 2007 with backers such as Whole Foods Market and was such a huge success that in 2008, the initiative expanded nation-wide. In cities across the country, volunteer coordinators are turning their city’s Halloween holiday healthy and eco-friendly, but many are also raising money for their own, local nonprofit beneficiaries via the initiative.

There are so many creative treat options at the wonderful Green Halloween website, that the site is worthy of a long exploration before the big day rolls around. My favorite concept and page dealt with the idea of giving treasures rather than candy. Click here for a list of possibilities. I’d already been thinking in that direction, and last year had cool pencils made from recycled Japanese newspapers. This year, I’m digging into my huge stash of fused glass magnets and giving those, because they truly are real one-of-a-kind treasures.

I’ll probably also tuck some bookmarks into each child’s bag – these happen to be from Little Pickle Press and list their award-winning books. Who knows? Maybe What Does It Mean To Be Green? will end up on some little person’s Christmas wish-list!

What about you? How do you feel about Halloween? Are you doing anything special to keep it green and healthy for yourchildren? Leave us a comment with your ideas.

What Does It Mean To Be Present?—The Song

By Rana DiOrio, Founder, Little Pickle Press

Did you know that Little Pickle Press has also produced an original composition for the award-winning children’s picture book, What Does It Mean To Be Present? The music and lyrics are by Jasmine Saldate, and John Alevizakis of Little Buddha Studio produced the song.

The Inspiration. Jasmine’s inspiration for What Does It Mean To Be Present? came from a visual of a child playing by a quiet river in the woods. As a child, being in nature was always a magical time for her and continues to be as an adult. Jasmine reflects, “Learning to take in the moments is so important. Many times I feel we enter into a place of quiet and make it loud because we do not stop to be present. The sooner we learn to be still, the sooner we can appreciate all of life’s little moments.” Jasmine was genuinely excited about the opportunity to sing about being present as it is a state of being that she aspires to achieve everyday.

The Lyrics. Here are the lyric’s to What Does It Mean To Be Present?, the song:

Here and now, the magic’s in the moment
Here and now is where I want to be
Lets slow down and see what’s all around us
Here and now is where I want to be
(Chorus)
Close your eyes, and listen to the music
Hear the beating inside of you
Take a moment to feel the rhythms all around you
Dance to the music that’s inside you.
(Chorus)
Fall into the stillness and silence
Dive into the dream
Wake into the gift
The gift of our being
Take me
Bring me to . . .
(Chorus) x2

The Song. By now, I’m hoping your interest is piqued. If so, please consider listening to the song by linking here: http://cdbaby.com/cd/littlepicklepressmusic3. And by all means, please tell us what you think about it in the comments here!

What Does It Mean To Be Present?—The Song

By Rana DiOrio, Founder, Little Pickle Press

Did you know that Little Pickle Press has also produced an original composition for the award-winning children’s picture book, What Does It Mean To Be Present? The music and lyrics are by Jasmine Saldate, and John Alevizakis of Little Buddha Studio produced the song.

The Inspiration. Jasmine’s inspiration for What Does It Mean To Be Present? came from a visual of a child playing by a quiet river in the woods. As a child, being in nature was always a magical time for her and continues to be as an adult. Jasmine reflects, “Learning to take in the moments is so important. Many times I feel we enter into a place of quiet and make it loud because we do not stop to be present. The sooner we learn to be still, the sooner we can appreciate all of life’s little moments.” Jasmine was genuinely excited about the opportunity to sing about being present as it is a state of being that she aspires to achieve everyday.

The Lyrics. Here are the lyric’s to What Does It Mean To Be Present?, the song:

Here and now, the magic’s in the moment
Here and now is where I want to be
Lets slow down and see what’s all around us
Here and now is where I want to be
(Chorus)
Close your eyes, and listen to the music
Hear the beating inside of you
Take a moment to feel the rhythms all around you
Dance to the music that’s inside you.
(Chorus)
Fall into the stillness and silence
Dive into the dream
Wake into the gift
The gift of our being
Take me
Bring me to . . .
(Chorus) x2

The Song. By now, I’m hoping your interest is piqued. If so, please consider listening to the song by linking here: http://cdbaby.com/cd/littlepicklepressmusic3. And by all means, please tell us what you think about it in the comments here!

Did you know LPP inked its first foreign rights deal in Korea and is seeking others?

By Rana DiOrio, Founder, Little Pickle Press

I find myself saying this often lately—what a difference a year makes! This time last year we had just launched our award-winning first title, What Does It Mean To Be Global? This year, we are putting the final touches on our fourth and fifth titles and celebrating the completion of our first foreign rights deal.

Due to the interest garnered by the Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA), who represented our initial title at the 2009 Frankfurt Book Festival, and by ForeWord Reviews, who represented our two titles at the 2010 Bologna Children’s Book Fair, we had four publishers pursuing foreign rights for the first two books of our What Does It Mean To Be . . .?® series. While I was at the 2010 Bologna Children’s Book Fair, I had the pleasure of meeting with the person ForeWord Reviews had engaged to manage their foreign rights meetings—Sylvia Hayse of Sylvia Hayse Literary Agency, LLC. I subsequently hired her to represent us directly and to negotiate with the Korean parties on our behalf.

While Sylvia was working her magic, I did a little research on the Korean children’s book market. I discovered that the children’s book market in Korea is doing surprisingly well. As evidence, Korea was the Guest of Honor at the 2009 Bologna Children’s Book Fair. According to the Korean Publishers’ Association, Korea’s book market ranks among the 10th largest in the world, with over 40,000 new titles published each year. Among them, children’s books make up about 19 percent of the market, which reflects not only the high enthusiasm that Korean parents have for their children’s education, but also the efforts of highly imaginative and innovative bookmakers and writers.

In a Publisher’s Weekly article I read, Eric Yang, President and CEO of RH Asia, was quoted as saying, “The nonfiction educational segment is faring much better than fiction or adult segments. Korean parents will save to buy educational books for their children, even in tough times.”

Other evidence that the children’s book segment is growing in popularity in Korea is that the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) launched a regional chapter in Korea in December 2008.

So after months of negotiation, Sylvia reached terms with the co-agent representing Blue Wing Publishing, Co. She brought the license agreement with her to BookExpo America 2010 in New York City, and I signed it. A few months later, I received the cross-signed agreement and a wire representing our advance. It was an especially great feeling to know that our meaningful messages to children had truly gone global.

Little Pickle Press, with Sylvia’s help, is actively seeking other foreign rights transactions. Interested parties should contact Sylvia directly at her place of work set forth below. For those authors with children’s book titles in English, please feel free to have your agent reach out to Kenny Kim, whose contact information is also below.

LPP’s Agent:
Sylvia Hayse
Sylvia Hayse Literary Agency, LLC
P.O. Box 1954
Bandon, OR 97411 USA
541.404.3127
email

Korean Co-Agent:
Kenny Kim / EntersKorea Co., Ltd
Foreign Rights Manager / English-Europe Department
A: 3F, Do Dream Bldg, #375-8, Mangwon-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul, 121-230, Korea
P: +82-2-3142-8136 (ext 3012)
F: +82-2-3142-8139
FR team www.ekagency.co.kr
TR team www.ekitc.com
DE team www.designbbook.com

Did You Know Watching Football Can Be More Fun Than Ever?

By Dani Greer

I grew up in a family of sports fans, football in particular being a friendly but competitive pastime. The rivalry between siblings and favorite teams has extended to their respective children, so it can be quite an exuberant crowd for some games. This good-natured sparring has extended to Facebook and it wouldn’t be a jump for any of the smartphone-toting youngsters to take it one social step further.

That’s where ThumpFootball comes into play, if you’ll pardon the pun. A new app available for most platforms and gadgets, Thump Football lets fans use their phones and computers to make mini-predictions about upcoming plays during live NFL – and even college football games for the parents with children away at school. Fans are scored in real-time based on outcomes in the games, and they can play with friends and family regardless of what device everyone has (in other words, everyone does not need an iPhone – one person can have that, one an Android, another a laptop) making the interactions that much easier. The game becomes even more challenging and exciting with this added ThumpFootball layer of interaction!

Want to add this challenge and fun to your favorite sport now? Download the free app from iTunes by clicking  here. I can see it now – a whole stadium full of screaming fans all playing ThumpFootball on their phones. Touch down!

On a bit more serious note, ThumpFootball is having a special promotion with several high-profile athletes starting today, October 22nd that will support One World Futbol. Another charity included is the Mark Rypien Foundation, which supports families who have children battling cancer. Little Pickle Press always loves helping good causes like these.

So are you ready to play? Just say Thump! and be sure to visit these links for more information:

On Twitter
On Faceboook
On YouTube
San Jose Business Journal

Did You Know Watching Football Can Be More Fun Than Ever?

By Dani Greer

I grew up in a family of sports fans, football in particular being a friendly but competitive pastime. The rivalry between siblings and favorite teams has extended to their respective children, so it can be quite an exuberant crowd for some games. This good-natured sparring has extended to Facebook and it wouldn’t be a jump for any of the smartphone-toting youngsters to take it one social step further.

That’s where ThumpFootball comes into play, if you’ll pardon the pun. A new app available for most platforms and gadgets, Thump Football lets fans use their phones and computers to make mini-predictions about upcoming plays during live NFL – and even college football games for the parents with children away at school. Fans are scored in real-time based on outcomes in the games, and they can play with friends and family regardless of what device everyone has (in other words, everyone does not need an iPhone – one person can have that, one an Android, another a laptop) making the interactions that much easier. The game becomes even more challenging and exciting with this added ThumpFootball layer of interaction!

Want to add this challenge and fun to your favorite sport now? Download the free app from iTunes by clicking  here. I can see it now – a whole stadium full of screaming fans all playing ThumpFootball on their phones. Touch down!

On a bit more serious note, ThumpFootball is having a special promotion with several high-profile athletes starting today, October 22nd that will support One World Futbol. Another charity included is the Mark Rypien Foundation, which supports families who have children battling cancer. Little Pickle Press always loves helping good causes like these.

So are you ready to play? Just say Thump! and be sure to visit these links for more information:

On Twitter
On Faceboook
On YouTube
San Jose Business Journal

Did you know there is a social networking site for parents and their children?

By Diane Darrow, Children’s Media Specialist

Togetherville: The Safe Social Network for Kids

Did you know that there is a social networking site for parents and their children? Togetherville provides parents of children between the ages of six and ten, an opportunity to model  appropriate online behavior. Just as adults monitor neighborhood playdates, friendships at school, and countless other social interactions, parents need  to oversee friendships online. Using a Facebook account, parents can create a profile for their child on Togetherville. The two sites are completely separate from one another. All interactions with children only occur on the Togetherville site and the parent decides who is on their child’s friends list.

The connection to Facebook does make it easy to add family and friends to their child’s account. Grandparents, aunts, and uncles will not have to wait until a major holiday to chat. Parents, who spend time away from their children, will enjoy this open line of communication and opportunity to take part in their child’s daily life. There are kid friendly activities such as games, badges for good on-line behavior, virtual gifts, videos, and even a chance to create art. Since parents pre-approve all on-line friends, children can use their real names and pictures.

It may seem silly to encourage a six year old to chat with their parents and friends online but possibly this is necessary step. Young children need concrete guidance navigating social networking sites. Togetherville gives parents an opportunity to teach digital responsibility, discuss cyber-bullying, and how to be a good online friend. Parents need to address this issue, before their child sets off into the great digital universe alone. This journey is inevitable; why not provide them with a map first?

Did you know there is a social networking site for parents and their children?

By Diane Darrow, Children’s Media Specialist

Togetherville: The Safe Social Network for Kids

Did you know that there is a social networking site for parents and their children? Togetherville provides parents of children between the ages of six and ten, an opportunity to model  appropriate online behavior. Just as adults monitor neighborhood playdates, friendships at school, and countless other social interactions, parents need  to oversee friendships online. Using a Facebook account, parents can create a profile for their child on Togetherville. The two sites are completely separate from one another. All interactions with children only occur on the Togetherville site and the parent decides who is on their child’s friends list.

The connection to Facebook does make it easy to add family and friends to their child’s account. Grandparents, aunts, and uncles will not have to wait until a major holiday to chat. Parents, who spend time away from their children, will enjoy this open line of communication and opportunity to take part in their child’s daily life. There are kid friendly activities such as games, badges for good on-line behavior, virtual gifts, videos, and even a chance to create art. Since parents pre-approve all on-line friends, children can use their real names and pictures.

It may seem silly to encourage a six year old to chat with their parents and friends online but possibly this is necessary step. Young children need concrete guidance navigating social networking sites. Togetherville gives parents an opportunity to teach digital responsibility, discuss cyber-bullying, and how to be a good online friend. Parents need to address this issue, before their child sets off into the great digital universe alone. This journey is inevitable; why not provide them with a map first?

Did You Know Little Pickle Press Has Won a Gold Moonbeam Award?

by Dani Greer

Little Pickle Press is thrilled to announce it has won a 2010 Moonbeam Gold Medal Award (in the category of Mind-Body-Spirit/Self-Esteem) for its most recent publication, What Does It Mean To Be Present? by Rana DiOrio and illustrated by Eliza Wheeler.

Awarded by the Jenkins Group and Independent Publishers Online,  the award honors the year’s best children’s books, authors, and illustrators and encourages children’s literacy and life-long learning.

There are 37 Moonbeam Awards categories, plus the Moonbeam Spirit Award winners. Each year’s entries are judged by expert panels of youth educators, librarians, booksellers, and book reviewers of all ages. You can see a list of all the winners and titles by clicking here.

The awards ceremony will be held in conjunction with the first annual Traverse City Children’s Book Festival, to be held on Saturday, November 13, 2010. The festival will feature children’s book authors, illustrators and storybook characters, games, and activities meant to inspire children’s interest in books. 

What Does It Mean To Be Present? is a refreshing, vibrant book that engages all of the senses to demonstrate the myriad of ways a child can seize the moment. The story sparks meaningful discussions about the important gift of appreciation, giving children and adults alike the opportunity to live more fully and richly.

You can click here to view the book trailer and here to buy a copy of the book. It is available in English and in Spanish.