Monthly Archives: March 2010

A View From The Bologna Children’s Book Fair 2010

March 24, 2010

I am attending the largest children’s book fair for the very first time. There is so much to say, but I will convey only the essential snapshot of this important annual event.

Perspective

The Moscone Center in San Francisco, CA, the venue for Fog City’s largest trade shows and conventions, is a postage stamp compared to the size of the Bologna Faire Center. I was told that the Bologna Faire Center is an order of magnitude smaller than the Messegelande, home to the Frankfurt Book Faire, the most important marketplace for books, media, rights, and licenses worldwide. The point is, be global with your perspective.

Lasting Impressions

The fair is a cornucopia of sites. Among them:
  • European men in finely-tailored suits.
  • Women wearing leather pants and others wearing baby doll dresses. A possible explanation for this dichotomy is that it snowed a foot on March 10th, so no one knew what to pack.
  • Waif-thin artists expressing themselves with DIY fashion.
  • Roller suitcases to carry all the product descriptions and marketing collateral.
  • Large and awkward artist portfolios.
  • A Ragassi award-winning publishing firm, impervious to the chaos around them, enjoying a lovely lunch together, complete with Italian wine (red) at a long table with a tablecloth (!), in their artfully-decorated booth.
  • With the exception of a newborn in a Bugaboo and a toddler sleeping in his mother’s lap (whose father was an illustrator promoting himself at the fair), children were noticeably absent. I know for sure, however, that my friend’s 10 year old will be attending the fair on Friday with his class, which will be a welcome addition to the very mature and serious energy that pervades the exhibition hall.

Take-away Messages:

While I can’t claim these as my own, as they were posted throughout the event, the themes of the event are important to convey to you:

  • Smell the paper. Touch the story.
  • Read slowly. Savor the wor(l)d.
  • Connect the ideas. Browse time.
  • Touch the screen. Enter the tale.
  • Close your eyes. See the image.
  • See the images. Imagine the future…

Conclusions:

One thing is eminently clear – the children’s book publishing industry is changing rapidly. Little Pickle Press is excited to be among those on the vanguard of the innovation.

A View From The Bologna Children’s Book Fair 2010

March 24, 2010

I am attending the largest children’s book fair for the very first time. There is so much to say, but I will convey only the essential snapshot of this important annual event.

Perspective

The Moscone Center in San Francisco, CA, the venue for Fog City’s largest trade shows and conventions, is a postage stamp compared to the size of the Bologna Faire Center. I was told that the Bologna Faire Center is an order of magnitude smaller than the Messegelande, home to the Frankfurt Book Faire, the most important marketplace for books, media, rights, and licenses worldwide. The point is, be global with your perspective.

Lasting Impressions

The fair is a cornucopia of sites. Among them:
  • European men in finely-tailored suits.
  • Women wearing leather pants and others wearing baby doll dresses. A possible explanation for this dichotomy is that it snowed a foot on March 10th, so no one knew what to pack.
  • Waif-thin artists expressing themselves with DIY fashion.
  • Roller suitcases to carry all the product descriptions and marketing collateral.
  • Large and awkward artist portfolios.
  • A Ragassi award-winning publishing firm, impervious to the chaos around them, enjoying a lovely lunch together, complete with Italian wine (red) at a long table with a tablecloth (!), in their artfully-decorated booth.
  • With the exception of a newborn in a Bugaboo and a toddler sleeping in his mother’s lap (whose father was an illustrator promoting himself at the fair), children were noticeably absent. I know for sure, however, that my friend’s 10 year old will be attending the fair on Friday with his class, which will be a welcome addition to the very mature and serious energy that pervades the exhibition hall.

Take-away Messages:

While I can’t claim these as my own, as they were posted throughout the event, the themes of the event are important to convey to you:

  • Smell the paper. Touch the story.
  • Read slowly. Savor the wor(l)d.
  • Connect the ideas. Browse time.
  • Touch the screen. Enter the tale.
  • Close your eyes. See the image.
  • See the images. Imagine the future…

Conclusions:

One thing is eminently clear – the children’s book publishing industry is changing rapidly. Little Pickle Press is excited to be among those on the vanguard of the innovation.